Dec 102016
 

First, install the OVF Tool.

Then, run the tool. The syntax looks like this:

If you see errors about virtual hardware not being supported, you can add the –lax parameter to the command line.

Sep 262012
 

If you are running a transparent HTTP proxy on your network, you may have trouble with running Internet Recovery and Apple Hardware Test on Macs that support it.  You’ll see a “-4403D” or “-4403F” error.  For some reason, Apple’s servers return a 403 when they see the “via” header that many proxy servers send.  Here’s the configuration I used in Squid to turn off that header.  I also disabled the “forwarded-for” header – essentially, this makes it impossible for servers to determine that the request is coming through a proxy server:

Aug 112012
 

I’ve been trying to install Mountain Lion in as a guest in Parallels 7, and I kept getting stuck at the initial grey Apple logo.

To fix it, I just changed the number of CPUs to 2, and it booted right up.  Other documents I’ve seen have indicated that you need to increase the video memory.  I did not need to do that, but it would probably help with performance.

Nov 162011
 

Often times, in your Squid proxy, you may have a redirector configured – such as SquidGuard:

I ran into a problem tonight with my Roku box where SquidGuard was seeing Roku’s NetFlix access as a security threat.  So, to make Squid bypass the redirector, add an ACL and a redirector-access rule:

There you have it – any requests to *.netflix.com will skip the redirector.

Nov 062011
 

By default, Squid sends HTTP headers on every request that can give away information about your internal network. Here’s an example of these headers:

That’s three pieces of information you may not want to give away: The host name of your proxy server, the version of Squid it’s running, and the IP address of the system that’s making the request via the proxy.

Fortunately, it’s simple (and does not apparently violate any standards) to make these headers more anonymous – just use these configuration directives in your squid.conf:

That will change the headers to look more like this:

Mar 012010
 

I spent some time thinking about backup strategy, and I decided for my purposes, I’d like to handle the staging process (getting all the files put together), and I’d like the backup solution itself to simply upload the files – but since I want to do nightly backups, I’d like the backup solution to have incremental capabilities.

I narrowed it down to two possible solutions – Tarsnap and Duplicity.  Both support incremental backups, both are command-line capable.  I decided to use Duplicity because it uploads directly to whichever back-end service you use – be it Amazon S3 or an SFTP server .  Tarsnap uses S3, but that’s your only option, and they do some processing for you, and because of that, it costs more.

Now, on to the details.

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Feb 032009
 

For those of you who don’t know, JungleDisk is a utility that allows you to back up data to Amazon’s Simple Storage Service (S3).  Soon, it will also allow you to use Mosso’s Cloud Files service, which is similar to S3 but hosted by RackSpace. I recently won a free subscription to JungleDisk, thanks to Mosso.

I’ve got JungleDisk set up on my Windows machine and it’s working really well. I was looking around the JungleDisk website, and I noticed that you’re allowed to install the desktop edition on as many computers as you want.  I’ve got two machines here at home – my laptop with Windows, and my file server running FreeBSD.  JungleDisk doesn’t have a native FreeBSD version, but they do offer a Linux version.  Seeing as FreeBSD does have a Linux compatibility layer, I figured I’d at least try to get it to work.  So far, I’ve been moderately successful.

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Feb 032009
 

Over the past few years, a major paradigm shift has occurred in how (and where) our data is stored.  We’ve had data online for quite a while – ever since the first “guestbook” applications appeared on peoples’ GeoCities home pages (usually right next to the animated “Under Construction” GIF).

I’m not going to discuss identity theft here – there are already enough posts about that topic. I’d like to discuss the social and professional aspects of our personal data that’s stored online, and the risks involved.

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